Whether Michael Brown shoplifted a pack of Swishers from a convenience store is completely fucking irrelevant to the excessive use of force by police, and it’s disgusting that the Ferguson Police Department would try and use some petty teenage misconduct to shift attention away from their murderous violence.

Link Ferguson, MO: They just fired on the crowd!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! peaceful protesters

cravingsolace:

postracialcomments:

http://new.livestream.com/accounts/9035483/events/3271930

watch this link please now!!!!!!!!!!!!

I showed my husband (an MP in the military) the video. He says that it was wrong for the following (and not just obvious) reasons:

  • With that…

laughingsquid:

Friendly Alpine Marmot Eagerly Devours A Yummy Carrot Offered by A Human Hand

Queuing this just so that something cute can break up some of the anger-inducing shit still being posted from Ferguson.

letterstomycountry:

terrapanda-ludo:

grilledsneakers:

This is what the people of Ferguson are up against and if you still don’t think that this is a big deal then you need to wake the fuck up

Fucking hell.

LTMC: Jesus, that girl’s face.

letterstomycountry:

LTMC: Why is it that Movement Conservatives talk so much about the importance of the right to keep and bear arms as insurance against tyrannical government, but when “certain” people actually try to exercise that right, they suddenly catch religion on non-violence?
Oh right, racism.  Carry on.

letterstomycountry:

LTMC: Why is it that Movement Conservatives talk so much about the importance of the right to keep and bear arms as insurance against tyrannical government, but when “certain” people actually try to exercise that right, they suddenly catch religion on non-violence?

Oh right, racism.  Carry on.

edwardspoonhands:

(because officers are thinking about how they’ll look on camera, not how to do their jobs)

I’m still looking for a negative here…nope…can’t find one.  They already videotape almost every traffic stop from an in-car camera, both for the officer’s safety and the people they are stopping.  This is the next logical step given the miniaturization and maturity of video technology. When cops know it won’t be a “officer of the law vs Joe Citizen” he-said-she-said tale in the courtroom, but rather there is video and audio to backup whatever claims are being made, both they, and the citizens they are supposed to protect, are covered.  Unless they are used to being assholes; in which case, yeah, those guys are just going to have bitch and moan and get over it (and hopefully get shitcanned after a proven string of complaints).

edwardspoonhands:

(because officers are thinking about how they’ll look on camera, not how to do their jobs)

I’m still looking for a negative here…nope…can’t find one. They already videotape almost every traffic stop from an in-car camera, both for the officer’s safety and the people they are stopping. This is the next logical step given the miniaturization and maturity of video technology. When cops know it won’t be a “officer of the law vs Joe Citizen” he-said-she-said tale in the courtroom, but rather there is video and audio to backup whatever claims are being made, both they, and the citizens they are supposed to protect, are covered. Unless they are used to being assholes; in which case, yeah, those guys are just going to have bitch and moan and get over it (and hopefully get shitcanned after a proven string of complaints).

thepeoplesrecord:

In Ferguson, Washington Post reporter Wesley Lowery gives account of his arrest
August 14, 2014

For the past week in Ferguson, reporters have been using the McDonald’s a few blocks from the scene of Michael Brown’s shooting as a staging area. Demonstrations have blown up each night nearby. But inside there’s WiFi and outlets, so it’s common for reporters to gather there.

That was the case Wednesday. My phone was just about to die, so as I charged it, I used the time to respond to people on Twitter and do a little bit of a Q&A since I wasn’t out there covering the protests.

As I sat there, many armed officers came in — some who were dressed as normal officers, others who were dressed with more gear.

Initially, both Ryan Reilly of the Huffington Post and I were asked for identification. I was wearing my lanyard, but Ryan asked why he had to show his ID. They didn’t press the point, but one added that if we called 911, no one would answer.

Then they walked away. Moments later, the police reemerged, telling us that we had to leave. I pulled my phone out and began recording video.

An officer with a large weapon came up to me and said, “Stop recording.”

I said, “Officer, do I not have the right to record you?”

He backed off but told me to hurry up. So I gathered my notebook and pens with one hand while recording him with the other hand.

As I exited, I saw Ryan to my left, having a similar argument with two officers. I recorded him, too, and that angered the officer. As I made my way toward the door, the officers gave me conflicting information.

One instructed me to exit to my left. As I turned left, another officer emerged, blocking my path.

“Go another way,” he said.

As I turned, my backpack, which was slung over one shoulder, began to slip. I said, “Officers, let me just gather my bag.” As I did, one of them said, “Okay, let’s take him.”

Multiple officers grabbed me. I tried to turn my back to them to assist them in arresting me. I dropped the things from my hands.

“My hands are behind my back,” I said. “I’m not resisting. I’m not resisting.” At which point one officer said: “You’re resisting. Stop resisting.”

That was when I was most afraid — more afraid than of the tear gas and rubber bullets.

As they took me into custody, the officers slammed me into a soda machine, at one point setting off the Coke dispenser. They put plastic cuffs on me, then they led me out the door.

I could see Ryan still talking to an officer. I said: “Ryan, tweet that they’re arresting me, tweet that they’re arresting me.”

He didn’t have an opportunity, because he was arrested as well.

The officers led us outside to a police van. Inside, there was a large man sitting on the floor between the two benches. He began screaming: “I can’t breathe! Call a paramedic! Call a paramedic!”

Ryan and I asked the officers if they intended to help the man. They said he was fine. The screaming went on for the 10 to 15 minutes we stood outside the van.

“I’m going to die!” he screamed. “I’m going to die! I can’t breathe! I’m going to die!”

Eventually a police car arrived. A woman — with a collar identifying her as a member of the clergy — sat in the back. Ryan and I crammed in next to her, and we took the three-minute ride to the Ferguson Police Department. The woman sang hymns throughout the ride.

During this time, we asked the officers for badge numbers. We asked to speak to a supervising officer. We asked why we were being detained. We were told: trespassing in a McDonald’s.

“I hope you’re happy with yourself,” one officer told me. And I responded: “This story’s going to get out there. It’s going to be on the front page of The Washington Post tomorrow.”

And he said, “Yeah, well, you’re going to be in my jail cell tonight.”

Once at the station, we were processed, our pockets emptied. No mug shots. They removed our restraints and put us in a holding cell. Ryan was able to get ahold of his dad. I called my mom, but I couldn’t get through. I couldn’t remember any phone numbers.

We were in there for what felt like 10 or 15 minutes. Then the processing officer came in.

“Who’s media?” he asked.

We said we were. And the officer said we were both free to go. We asked to speak to a commanding officer. We asked to see an arrest report. No report, the officer told us, and no, they wouldn’t provide any names.

I asked if there would ever be a report. He came back with a case number and said a report would be available in a week or two.

“The chief thought he was doing you two a favor,” he said.

The Ferguson Police Department did not immediately respond to a request for comment on Lowery’s detention.

Source

So at what point does the state law enforcement get involved, and if they aren’t willing, federal LEOs?

danagould:


Two years ago, I was performing at The Punchline in San Francisco, and Robin came to the show with our mutual friend, Dan Spencer.
This particular batch of material was the first time I had touched upon my then still-fresh divorce wounds, and big chunks of it were pretty dark. The next day, I got a text from a number I didn’t recognize. Whoever it was had obviously been to the show and knew my number, so I figured they would reveal themselves at some point and save me the embarrassment of asking who they were.
The Mystery Texter asked how I was REALLY doing. “You can’t fool me. Some of those ‘jokes’ aren’t ‘jokes.” By now I knew that whoever this was had been through what I was enduring, as no one else would know to ask, “What time of day is the hardest?”
He wanted to know how my kids were handling it, all the while assuring me that the storm, as bleak as it was, would one day pass and that I was not, as I was then convinced, a terrible father for visiting a broken home upon my children.
I am not rewriting this story in retrospect to make it dramatic. I did not know who I was texting with. Finally, my phone blipped, and I saw, in a little green square, “Okay, pal. You got my number. Call me. I’ve been there. You’re going to be okay. - Robin.”
That is what you call a human being.


sniff

danagould:

Two years ago, I was performing at The Punchline in San Francisco, and Robin came to the show with our mutual friend, Dan Spencer.

This particular batch of material was the first time I had touched upon my then still-fresh divorce wounds, and big chunks of it were pretty dark. The next day, I got a text from a number I didn’t recognize. Whoever it was had obviously been to the show and knew my number, so I figured they would reveal themselves at some point and save me the embarrassment of asking who they were.

The Mystery Texter asked how I was REALLY doing. “You can’t fool me. Some of those ‘jokes’ aren’t ‘jokes.” By now I knew that whoever this was had been through what I was enduring, as no one else would know to ask, “What time of day is the hardest?”

He wanted to know how my kids were handling it, all the while assuring me that the storm, as bleak as it was, would one day pass and that I was not, as I was then convinced, a terrible father for visiting a broken home upon my children.

I am not rewriting this story in retrospect to make it dramatic. I did not know who I was texting with. Finally, my phone blipped, and I saw, in a little green square, “Okay, pal. You got my number. Call me. I’ve been there. You’re going to be okay. - Robin.”

That is what you call a human being.

sniff

This sucks :(


RIP Robin.

le-grand-meaulnes:

peelman:

stele3:

Ferguson Police have dogs and shotguns. The unarmed crowd is raising their hands.

For anyone not following the Mike Brown story on Twitter: a 17 year old black boy named Mike Brown, who was supposed to start college tomorrow, was shot to death in Ferguson, Missouri by police while jaywalking. He was unarmed. He was shot 9 times.

Initial media reports claimed that an 18 year old black man had been shot and killed while fleeing police after shoplifting.

People in the neighborhood, including members of Mike Brown’s family, came out of their homes and began to protest, shouting “no justice, no peace,” and keeping their hands in the air.

Media reports claimed that a violent mob quickly formed around the shooting location shouting “kill the police.”

Spread this. Tell the truth about what happened to this boy. Tell the truth about what is happening NOW. The police and the mainstream media is painting him as a criminal, and his community as a violent mob.

SPREAD THIS. Don’t let them lie.

So here’s my problem with this: It doesn’t matter if 20 or 2000 people encircle a dozen cops with their hands raised and singing kumbaya; it only takes one nut job to NOT raise their hands, and instead raise a gun to turn this from an isolated tragedy into a nationwide spectacle. ONE guy opens fire, and the cops return fire. Bystanders are caught in the crossfire, and things escalate out of the control quickly.

I have no doubts that there are a lot of racist, nut job cops, because there are a lot of racist nut job people out there. Statistically speaking, its a certainty. But assuming that all of them on that scene are racist white assholes is racist as well. There are some there doing their jobs to the best of their abilities, trying to be fair and just in their work. And being surrounded, regardless of the apparent intentions of the crowd, would make anybody nervous.

Yes its a bunch of white cops and a sea of black faces and that’s shitty for both sides. No I don’t think they were justified at all in shooting an unarmed person nine times. But, no I don’t think going out and antagonizing the situation is going to help anything, regardless of how peaceful you might think you are being.

The proper place to deal with this is the courtrooms, not the streets.

I would agree with this wholeheartedly if the courts didn’t have a horrendous record of getting this wrong.

Be that as it may, and I agree that the courts have a terrible track record, there isn’t an alternative. The broken system is everybody’s problem, it’s just hard to get those in power to give a shit.